The Man From Bor

The Man From Bor

http://happiestfacesonearth.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/The-Man-From-Bor.mp4 Meet Peter and his amazing son Jacob from Bor, South Sudan. Hear his heartbreaking story of being driven with his family from their home and farm, leaving everything behind as they fled for their lives. A few months later, they find their way to a refugee camp in Uganda where Peter is hit by a truck in the night and left for dead. We meet him at a local hospital here in Gulu and hurt with him as we hear his tale. When will the war end? When can he return with his family to his homeland? What is the meaning of all this killing of brother against brother? No answers are given, but a plea for help from America will draw on your sympathies. The man from Bor is only one story among hundreds of thousands just as difficult. Join us in a prayer for increased peace in this war-torn region of...
Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

One of our favorite books of all time is Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. Our oldest daughter recommended it to us years ago. Published in 1852 in the U.S. at a time when slavery was a critical issue and the Civil War was on the brink, Mrs. Stowe’s bold novel addressed very sensitive issues that caused an uproar on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line. She was one of the great masters of the English language as well as a revolutionary in defense of freedom of all men regardless of race. She was a very devout Christian who raised seven sons, all of whom became ministers. If you have never read this great American classic, we urge you to do so. Being in Africa and reading this book is an amazing experience. RaNae is re-reading it now and has shared parts with me as I await my turn. Here is the latest paragraph she shared just yesterday. “If ever Africa shall show an elevated and cultivated race,—and come it must, some time, her turn to figure in the great drama of human improvement.—life will awake there with a gorgeousness and splendor of which our cold western tribes faintly have conceived. In that far-off mystic land of gold, and gems, and spices, and waving palms, and wondrous flowers, and miraculous fertility, will awake new forms of art, new styles of splendor; and the negro race, no longer despised and trodden down, will, perhaps, show forth some of the latest and most magnificent revelations of human life. Certainly they will, in their gentleness, their lowly docility of heart, their aptitude to...

Letter from Grandpa T

My Dear Grandkids: I want to have a very honest and direct talk with you and I ask that you please listen carefully to your Grandpa T. You know that Grandma and I love being missionaries here in Uganda, and enjoy getting to know the people and the culture. But one thing that really breaks my heart is to see the extreme struggles the people go through because of flaws in their culture. Let me explain. Lying is a huge problem here. People will lie to your face in a very convincing way if they feel they can benefit. They make up the most heartbreaking stories to get your sympathy, hoping you will give them money or pay for their school or medical costs. It’s very hard for us missionaries not to help since it is against the rules and often ends up hindering their self-reliance. Stealing is so rampant here that you have to live inside a kind of jail with bars on your doors and windows, and a full time guard inside a tall walled fence with razor wire on top. If someone can get to your stuff, they will take it. Just today Grandma saw of a woman at church who had left her scriptures on a chair for a minute with here tithing inside the cover, only to return and find the money gone – this is at church, mind you. Then there is the huge problem of immorality. By the time a child reaches puberty, about age 11 to 12, most have experienced sex by abuse or by choice. Men can go to a nearby bar and pay...