B’s Story

B’s Story

My name is B____ of Gulu, Uganda, and this is my story. After being married to my first husband several years, and having three children, he was killed in northern Uganda due to war. We never knew if it was the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army) or Uganda military that killed him, but he was gone and I was alone. Because of the ongoing war of that time, my parents and eldest brother were burned alive when their mud and grass huts were set afire by the rebels with them locked inside. After that, I had no living family. After some time, I began staying with a new husband. With him I had two more children, but life was very difficult. This man was not good. He did not know God, and took alcohol very very much. One day he told me he was going to do something that was so big it would be told over the radio. I reported it to the police, but when they interviewed him, he denied it, so they did nothing. Later, I went to the village to get some food and was gone several days. When I returned, I found that my husband had defiled my two daughters several times. The youngest was then 8 years old. I went to the police, but my husband ran away and I have not seen him since. A charitable organization helped pay for my little girls to be tested and treated for disease. Fortunately, they did not have HIV. After some time and medication, they healed from the abuse. As I was again alone, I moved around trying to find work to...
Ugandan Diet

Ugandan Diet

Trying to get your mind around what it’s like to be Ugandan is like trying to understand the perils of Everest by watching the movie. It simply cannot conjure. We’ve been here for over 10 months now, and have been deep in the bush and deep in the lives and challenges of these amazing people. But we have come to realize how impossible it is for us to truly understand them fully. We are so well cared for as missionaries that we are among the most pampered people in all of Uganda. We are very, very comfortable by Ugandan standards. So, we meet with the people and try to grasp it, but the full concept escapes us. Just one example is how often, and what our friends eat. Many if not most adults eat just one meal a day, and that meal consists of posho (corn mush) and beans, eaten with the fingers. I started taking a little informal survey and found many people who have not more than one meal per day. At first I thought it was rare, but have come to see it is very normal. While with people in their huts, I’ll ask, Have you eaten yet today?  Based on my unscientific poll, I’d guess that more than half the adults here live on one meal per day. Otherwise, they may take some tea, or just drink water. To better understand how this feels, I decided to do a personal experiment, which will not surprise those who know me. Starting the first of November, I have had only one meal per day. The experience has...
November Scrapbook

November Scrapbook

We experience so many random things every day that can’t be organized into a logical blog. So, we’ll deluge you with a flood of photos that you can sort out as you please. What an adventure! The top image is of Elder & Sister Tim and Susanne Gillett, from Mapleton. They arrived in mission a few weeks ago and we finally caught up with them. It was a wonderful and therapeutic reunion. We went to retrieve a group of Elders who totaled their truck at Chobe game park this week. (please do not share the photo of the wrecked truck). All six Elders crawled from the wreck unscathed except for one scraped arm. The truck was completely demolished. Missionaries are indeed protected, even when they are less than careful....
Regulation in the Church

Regulation in the Church

For behold, because of…the many little dissensions and disturbances which had been among the people, it became expedient that the word of God should be declared among them, yea, and that a regulation should be made throughout the church. Alma 45:21 Due to a recent policy statement by the Church regarding the delayed baptism of children of gay parents, there has been a plethora of chatter in social media and elsewhere. When we heard this news just today, we read some of the comments by friends and family. As I thought about my own feelings on the matter, I was not a whit concerned with the policy, nor did I question it. I completely trust the Brethren. The thing that did strike me is how thankful I am that the Church actually has a system of regulation, and these regulations apply to Church members in all the world. There are two handbooks of instruction used by Church leaders worldwide. Handbook #1 is for local leadership and handbook #2 is for general and local officers of the Church. The newly released statement of policy regarding children of gay parents will be included in these handbooks. And for that I am very grateful. What is the policy on this same topic in the Baptist Church, the Pentocostal Church, or the Assembly of God? I daresay they have none as a unit. Here in Uganda, we sometimes struggle with what is termed the pastor mentality, wherein a pastor of a church runs things his way. He may say something from the pulpit regarding morality, for example, yet be immoral himself in his personal life. If...